Advancement of Women – May 19, 2017

Despite new limitations, Egyptian women are still active

The Washington Post – May 5, 2017: In March, the Egyptian regime celebrated Mother’s Day, honoring a number of “role models par excellence,” including actresses, academics, athletes, professionals, and mothers of army and police martyrs. However, the celebration conspicuously failed to include any independent feminist figure or vocal women’s rights advocates.

As a single event, this might seem like a simple oversight. But situated within the current landscape of women’s rights in Egypt, the message is clear. The ideal mother and woman is utterly apolitical in her pursuit of success and rights.

 

Women’s quota a ‘national right’: Ogasapian

The Daily Star – May 4, 2017: Lebanon’s Minister of State for Women’s Affairs Jean Ogasapian Thursday said that a women’s quota for Parliament is a “national right”

 

Afghan-American woman pilot breaks barriers

Al Jazeera English – May 18, 2017: Shaesta Waiz was born in a refugee camp at the end of the Soviet war in Afghanistan before moving to the US with her family in 1987.

The 29-year-old discovered a passion for flying and obtained her pilot’s licence, becoming the youngest certified civilian female pilot from Afghanistan.
Now, Waiz wants to share that sense of freedom of soaring high above the ground with other young women.

Waiz, an engineering graduate, took off from Daytona Beach, Florida, last week aboard her Beechcraft Bonanza A36.

 

Dammam Airports Company hires first Saudi woman executive

Al Arabiya English – May 15, 2017: Dammam Airports Company has hired its first Saudi woman as an executive director.

Hind Al-Zahid became the first Saudi woman to work as an executive director and member of Dammam Airports Executive Board chaired by Abdullah Al-Zamil.

The decision to hire Al-Zahid was approved by the General Authority of Civil Aviation (GACA) in a meeting chaired by Minister of Transport and head of GACA Sulaiman Al-Hamdan…

Al-Zahid promised that she will live up to the trust reposed in her.

 

The new Miss USA helps regulate nuclear power plants

Al Arabiya English – May 15, 2017: The Miss USA pageant on Sunday touted American diversity, and chose an African-American chemist with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to wear the crown.

Kara McCullough from the US capital will go on to represent the United States at the Miss Universe contest.

“We regulate nuclear power plants. And I have a personal community outreach program called science exploration for kids,” said McCullough, 25.

McCullough was born in Italy and also lived in Japan, South Korea, Hawaii. She was raised in the southern US state of Virginia.

As Miss USA “my plan is to inspire and encourage so many children and women (to enter) the science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields,” she said.

 

Arab heroes who change lives

The National – May 18, 2017: DUBAI // Inspirational Arabs were recognised for changing the lives of thousands, as Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid urged people to “fight the wave of desperation that is taking over our Arab world”.

A refugee co-ordinator who scrambles boats for drowning refugees and members of the White Helmets rescue workers of Syria were among five recipients of the Arab Hope Maker Awards. Each were handed Dh1 million in recognition of their dedication.

The awards ceremony in Dubai Studio City on Thursday night was the culmination of a region-wide search to identify role models, humanitarian workers and inspirational individuals helping their communities.

In total more than 65,000 were nominated from 22 Arab states.

The plan was to choose one winner, but when Sheikh Mohammed, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai, stepped on to the stage it was revealed that all five finalists would receive the Dh1m prize.

Nawal Al Soufi, the official winner, works to save refugees from sinking boats in the Mediterranean. Born in Morocco and raised in Catania in Sicily, she fights a daily battle to stem the tide of Syrian deaths as they try to cross from North Africa to Italy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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